Buriton January 2021

Today I went for my first serious walk in months around Buriton
This particular place is very good for Asplenium scolopendrium, which looks at its most spectacular when all the other vegetation around it has died down

Also in this area is one patch of Asplenium adiantum-nigrum. This fern is common growing in walls in Hampshire but is rare growing in the ground. It also looks its best in winter

Sowing Spores – the Munyard method

This post is about how I sow the spores I have received from the BPS Spore Exchange using a method decribed to me by Steve Munyard
To this end I bought 50 small square pots from ebay . They are rugged and microwave proof

I fill 20 of these with cheap compost from Wilkinsons and place them in a large propagator
I fill the propagator with water to about 1cm
I replace the lid and and leave for 24 hours for the compost to become fully wet

After 24 hours I put each pot singly into my (dirty) microwave and cook on full power for 2 minutes
I take the pot out and cover with cardboard and replace in the propagator
Again I replace the lid and leave for 24 hours to cool down

I sort out my spores and create labels using the Dymo label printer

The spore packets that arrive from the BPS are beautifully wrapped in aluminium foil
I unpack them carefully using a scalpel

Eventually you will find the spores inside

I keep the propagator in my conservatory and I take one pot, one at time, into the kitchen where I unwrap a spore package and place it carefully into the pot and then replace the cardboard and replace it in the propagator

Eventually the propgator has all 20 pots and the lid is replaced

Both the cardboard and the aluminium can be removed in 24-48 hours

Steve tells me that the only additional thing he does is to have artificial LED light on top of the propagator as this seems to speed things up. The lights are on for 10 to 12 hours a day
My propogator is in my conservatory which has quite a lot of light

Ferns of Europe

This table shows all the countries in Europe (and surrounding area)
It is sorted by default in the order of the number of ferns in each country but it can be sorted in any order you like by clciking on the title of the column you are interested in
The data for the fern count comes from Hassler, Michael (2004 – 2020): World Plants. Synonymic Checklist and Distribution of the World Flora. Version 11.1; www.worldplants.de

CountryFern CountArea km2Ferns per km2
Italy1182941400.000401
France1175475570.000214
Spain1064988000.000213
Turkey987696300.000127
Germany843485600.000241
Croatia80559600.001430
United_Kingdom792419300.000327
Switzerland77395160.001949
Georgia761539090.000494
Austria75824090.000910
Russia74163768700.000005
Norway713652680.000194
Czechia71788660.000900
Slovakia68480880.001414
Slovenia68201400.003376
Greece671289000.000520
Poland663062300.000216
Morocco644463000.000143
Sweden634103400.000154
Montenegro62134500.004610
Portugal61915900.000666
Romania612301700.000265
Iran5916285500.000036
Bulgaria581085600.000534
Ireland58688900.000842
Kazhakstan5827250000.000021
Serbia58874600.000663
Ukraine585793200.000100
Finland573038900.000188
North_Macedonia57252200.002260
Azerbaijan56826580.000677
Hungary56905300.000619
Belgium55302800.001816
Albania54274000.001971
Algeria5323817400.000022
Bosnia_and_Herzegovina53511970.001035
Estonia48423900.001132
Denmark47424300.001108
Armenia44284700.001545
Latvia44622000.000707
Netherlands44337200.001305
Belarus432029100.000212
Tunisia391553600.000251
Lithuania37626740.000590
Iceland361002500.000359
Lebanon32102300.003128
Malta263200.081250
Saudi_Arabia2621496900.000012
Cyprus2392400.002489
Turkmenistan194699300.000040
Uzbekistan194489780.000042
Iraq184343200.000041
Israel18221450.000813
Syria161836300.000087
Luxembourg625860.002320
Jordan5887800.000056
Liechtenstein31600.018750
Moldova3328500.000091
Monaco02020.000000
San Marino061.20.000000
Kosovo0108870.000000

News from Southport Fernery

Progress has continued at the Fernery, despite the difficulties caused by Covid and lock-down. Sandra and Gary have kept up the watering and weeding, and recently a broken-down planting pocket has been re-built, using lime mortar. Michael has added many more plants to the wall pockets, when regulations permitted him to return to the Fernery. The Cyatheas that were colliding with the roof have been removed, and new tree ferns have put on good growth. The park and BGCA were successful in their bid for the ‘Community Green Flag’ award, at the first attempt – very well done! The park remains open, and a new stumpery is being established not far from the Fernery. The Fernery was briefly open to the public in the Summer with a limit of six people inside at any one time. The doors at the north end have been repaired so that a one-way system can operate – the hope being that the Fernery will be able to open to the public again from Easter.

The Fernery is also home to flowering plants, with orchids, epiphyllums, Christmas cactus, clivias, and passion flowers to name a few. The established ferns are thriving too!