Saturday June 28th 2014

Logan Botanic Garden – Bioblitz

Led by: Heather McHaffie

Dicksonia antarctica in the exotic garden
Dicksonia antarctica in the exotic garden

The Logan Botanic Garden is situated on the Mull of Galloway in the extreme south-west of Scotland, and is one of the regional gardens of the Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh; warmed by the Gulf Stream, it has many plants which cannot survive elsewhere in Scotland. Bridget Laue and I went there to participate in a Bioblitz to help raise the profile of ferns in this most fern-rich garden. With its especially mild and wet climate, the garden has recent mass plantings of many exotic ferns and a famous group of old Dicksonia antarctica, which have self-sown abundantly. Due to its remote location the garden receives fewer visitors than it deserves, but the Bioblitz event helped to attract people to see the range of plants and animals that have naturally colonised the garden. Our wild fern count made a small contribution to the total, with only the common species which would be found in most areas of Scotland. On our display table we showed people fern spores, talked about the fern life-cycle and how to grow ferns. As always, the biggest attraction was the microscope with Equisetum spores. Two families of young children made repeated visits to see them and became very proficient at ‘breathing’ on the spores for each other. It was an especially interesting day for us to see how the new plantings are developing and I would strongly recommend a visit.

Heather at the display table
Heather at the display table

Heather McHaffie

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The website for people who like ferns